Historical Romance

Sacrifice & Share: Home Attitudes during World War II

by Cece Whittaker

Not surprisingly, the World War II era is a favored setting for historical romance novels. One of the many reasons for this is the common phenomenon of personal sharing. At home in America, it was a special time in recorded history during which general goodwill and sacrifice was the way of life. Scaring up an extra plateful for someone’s visiting cousin or fellow worker was not embarrassing or something to put up with. It was an opportunity to serve, and as such, a powerful weapon against depression and confusion.

baby children cute dress
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“Share and Play Square”

Most of the drive behind taking the high road was dedicated to support, whether toward the men at the front, the men and women at home on base, or in factories, or even the children coming up in what would otherwise be an unacceptably tumultuous world. The country was ripe with helpful and inspirational slogans.  Terrence Witkowski in his work, “The American Consumer Home Front During World War II,” agrees. He feels that this element of World War II’s history telling has been largely “Produce and Conserve, Share and Play Square.” (Witkowski, 1998)

“Meatless Monday”

Something about the feeling of we’re-all-in-this-together provides comfort and closes out thoughts of who will get that paralyzing telegram next, and what will the papers say tomorrow? Limited meat resources created almost a celebration in offering up a meatless night of the week, usually Monday. For Catholics, this was a double, as Fridays without meat were already the rule. “Rationing meant sacrifices for all,” the author of World War II Rationing says. He further describes “Sugar Buying Cards,” which allotted specific measures of sugar which families were eligible to buy, based on the number of family members.   (World War II Rationing, n.d.) See more about the Meatless Monday at www.u-s-history.com.

Some historical romance novels celebrate the humanity and laughter, but also include sacrifice and the heartache of separation during this very emotional, yet kindness and sharing time. My series contributes in that direction. www.cecewhittakerstories.com.

Bibliography

Witkowski, T. H. (1998). The American Consumer Home Front During World War Ii. ACR North American Advances. Retrieved 7 27, 2018, from http://acrwebsite.org/search/view-conference-proceedings.aspx?id=8204

World War II Rationing. (n.d.). Retrieved 7 27, 2018, from U-s-history.com: http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1674.html

 

 

Author · Christian Author · Historical Romance

Return to Simple?

What are women readers seeking today?

Having worked through the myriad of spy and terrorist stories, all packaged in shiny, flashy covers featuring nearly exposed women and bare-chested males glittering in sweat, women and old and young may now be turning to a more wholesome entertainment in ladies’ fiction.

Capturing times gone by, without altering the actual circumstances, many newer writers are focusing on the positive side. The post-Babyboomer writer, sometimes referred to as the Babyboomer II, seems to want to concentrate on spreading hope and humor. These 53-60-year-olds graduated high school during very difficult times, having been confronted with the introductions of the first gasoline “crunch,” Jimmy Carter tax expansion, and Richard Nixon China trade. Work was not as freely available to this group as it was to their boomer predecessors.

Taking the high road

According the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 1982, conditions of unemployment ranked highest since 1947, at 9.7% that year, followed by only a slight drop in 1983, at 9.6%. Without the rapid rise on the traditional job track, post-Boomers in large part turned to hope. Writing wholesome ladies’ fiction is one growing outlet. “I’ve been accused of being an optimist and a fantasizer,” says author of The Call to Serve, Cece Whittaker, “and if that’s true, I guess it’s a good thing. As a writer, that’s what keeps me going.”

It may be fantasy, but decorum and wholesome entertainment are not new, just not recent. According to http://www.thegreatestbooks.org, Don Quixote, In Search of Lost Time, and War and Peace all rank in the top 5 of the most popularly acclaimed books of all time, not to mention the wild frenzy for Pride & Prejudice.

What’s Ahead?

Not to say you can’t still find that blockbuster with dirty teeth, but the late 20-teens are seeing a rebirth of decorum and genuine inspiration. Not surprisingly, the movement is led by a refreshing return of wholesome entertaining ladies’ fiction.